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News Archives 2009

FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM OFFERS SPECIAL TELESCOPES AND FREE WORKSHOPS CELEBRATING INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF ASTRONOMY 2009

Developed by a team of astronomers, optical engineers and educators, Galileoscopes commemorate Galileo's first use of a telescope

Reno, Nev., Dec. 11, 2009 - As part of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 marking the 400th anniversary of Galileo's use of an astronomical telescope, the Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno is offering a limited supply of Galileoscopes.

"Galileoscopes were designed by a team of leading astronomers, optical engineers and science educators as an inexpensive but effective way to see the celestial wonders that Galileo Galilei first glimpsed 400 years ago - including lunar craters, four moons circling Jupiter, the phases of Venus, Saturn's rings, and countless stars invisible to the unaided eye," said Dan Ruby, associate director of the Fleischmann Planetarium. "We're fortunate to have several of these commemorative telescope kits available in time for holiday gift givers."

According to Ruby, the scope was also developed to help improve math, science and technology literacy worldwide. "The kit is augmented with free multilingual educational and observational activities for use by classroom teachers, astronomy-club members, and anyone else eager to share the wonders of optics and the treats of the telescopic sky with others," he said.

The Galileoscope kit comes with simple instructions for no-tools assembly. Its achromatic optics include a 50-mm-diameter glass objective lens of focal length 500 mm, a plastic eyepiece of focal length 20 mm (magnification 25x), and a plastic 2x Barlow lens yielding 50x when used with the supplied eyepiece. The Galileoscope attaches to any standard tripod made or distributed anywhere in the world. The Planetarium is offering Galileoscopes for $25 each, pre-assembled or as a kit with a coupon for a free build/use workshop, or $35 including a high-quality aluminum tripod.

The free hour-long Galileoscope workshops will be offered by the Fleischmann Planetarium throughout the end of the year and into spring 2010, and will cover telescope fundamentals, including construction and use of the Galileoscope, and will include a showing of the commemorative film, "Two Small Pieces of Glass." The workshops will culminate with a stargazing opportunity.

Endorsed by the United Nations and UNESCO, the International Year of Astronomy 2009 celebrates astronomy's contributions to society and culture, helps "connect the dots" between science, technology, and prosperity, and aims to stimulate worldwide interest, especially among young people, in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. For more about IYA2009, visit http://www.astronomy2009.org.

Download the Galileoscope Observing Guide PDF.
Download the Galileoscope Assembly Instructions PDF.



Prospectives.09 International Digital Arts Festival

November 12- 14, 2009, University of Nevada, Reno
http://www.unr.edu/art/prospectives09.html
Download an event flier (pdf)

Exhibit > Present > Perform > Project > NetArt
Prospectives.09 is the international festival showcasing the work of graduate and Phd candidates working across a diverse spectrum of digital arts practice. The festival showcases the work of 37 artists and performers from throughout the United States and internationally (including artists from Australia, United Kingdom, India, South Africa, Chile, Sweden and Portugal).

This event presents a unique opportunity to experience the cutting edge of digital production in the visual, performing and auditory arts. Artists working in and across disciplines were invited to submit works to be considered for five interrelated events: Exhibit; Present/Symposium; Project: A/V; Perform; and NetArt. Venues include: The University of Nevada, Reno, Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery, Joe Crowley Student Union, Fleishmann Planetarium and Science Center and the Nevada Museum of Art.

Prospectives.09 features a wide range visual and performative media incorporating digital systems, including but not limited to: interactive art, movement/dance, internet art, video art, generative systems, telepresence, computer gaming, electronic music and “mixed reality” performance art.

Event Schedule & Highlights:

Present/Symposium
Thursday November 12th, 10am –12pm and 1pm- 5pm
Joe Crowley Student Union Theater, Third Floor, UNR Campus
FREE

The day features individual presentations by 13 US and internationally invited, cutting edge digital artists. Presentations include descriptions of performance and mixed reality works in Second Life, computer gaming, interactive books, multi-channel experimental video, electronic sculpture and sound.

Including Featured Artists: Georgie Roxby Smith, Victorian College of the Arts, Australia; Christina Corfield, San Francisco Art Institute; Sarah Soriano, University of Denver; Joe Cantrell, UC Santa Cruz; Garnet Hertz, UC Irvine; Carolina Pino, University of Chile; Pete Wardle, Salford University, UK; Aaron Reed, UC Santa Cruz; Karen Niemczyk, Gothenburg University, Sweden

Highlights include: Karen Niemczyk, of the C:Art:Media Masters Program, Gothenburg University/Chalmers, Gothenburg, Sweden, discusses her project “SELF”, an sculptural installation that interacts with viewers who by their existence affect the sculpture, triggering sequences of light movement. http://www.interpolations.org/

Exhibit/Interact
Opening: Thursday November 12, 6:00-8:00pm Festival Opening Reception
Exhibit: Thursday November 12th – Wednesday December 16th, 2009
Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery, UNR campus
FREE
Showcasing new works in interactive art by prospective, emerging talent in the digital realm.

Including Featured Artists: Rob Duarte, UC San Diego; Joshua Fishburn, University of Denver; Jason Nelson, Griffith University, Australia; John Walters, University of Michigan; Doo Sung Yoo, Ohio State University; Samson Young, Princeton University; Sven Goyvaerts, Transmedia, Belgium; Johan Bruckner-Cohen, Trinity College, Ireland

Highlights include: Johan Bruckner-Cohen, Phd Candidate Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland presents “Alerting Infrastructure”. The work is a physical “hit counter” in the form of an electric impact drill that literally translates hits to the web site of the University of Nevada, Reno into the physical destruction of the gallery wall by an automated impact drill. http://www.coin-operated.com/projects/alertinginfrastructure.html

Project: A/V
Friday November 13th, 7:00pm
Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, UNR campus
$6 general, $4 students/children/seniors
Digital works utilizing the full-dome planetarium environment, for immersive, dome-based video projection and experimental audio compositions.

Including Featured Artists: Josh Goldman, University of Cincinnati; George Marie, University of Utah; David Snedegar, University of Utah; Stephanie Dodes, San Francisco Art Institute; Mattia Casalegno, UCLA

Highlights include: Mattia Casalegno, of the UCLA Design and Media Arts program presents "Strutture Dissipative", an audiovisual site-specific projection, Casalegno developed a custom made software in the attempt to digitally synthesize complex patterns and emerging processes found in nature. http://www.mattiacasalegno.net/index.php?/projects/strutture-dissipative/

Perform
Saturday November 14th, 2:00pm
The Wayne and Miriam Prim Theater, Nevada Museum of Art
FREE (Limited tickets available NMA front desk and UNR Sheppard Gallery - 18 and over, some material not suitable for minors.)
An afternoon of six new works in experimental performance art, dance, live sound and video projection.

Including Featured Performers: Giuseppe Di Bella, Slade School London, UK; Natalia Jaegar, Arizona State University; Stephanie Lie, UC San Diego; Tara Rynderes, University of Colorado, Boulder; Karl Mendonca, New School University, NYC; Elle Mehrmand and Micah Cardenas, UC San Diego

Highlights include: “technésexual” by Elle Mehrmand and Micah Cardenas, UCSD, MFA Candidates in Visual Arts. A “mixed reality” live performance on stage at the Nevada Museum of Art and in the online community of Second Life. The performers passionately kiss each other while wearing biometric sensors including heart rate monitors and temperature sensors. The sensor data is computer processed to produce live audio, including the live sound of their heart beats; this audio is transmitted live into Second Life as their avatars kiss, linking their physical bodies to their virtual avatars. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lotu5/sets/72157621943139937/
http://vimeo.com/7240418

NetArt
Online gallery of selected works - internet based artworks, games and portfolio sites.
Opens November 12, archived permanently on festival website
http://www.unr.edu/art/prospectives09/netart.html
FREE

Including Featured Artists:  UE Ukpong, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, South Africa; J. Coogan, New School, Media Studies, NYC; Aaron Reed, UC Santa Cruz; Jo Mills, University of Wolverhampton, UK; Filipe Pais, Feup, Porto, Portugal; Ignacio Partarrieu and Gabriel Beherns, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Chile; Jason Nelson, Griffith University, Australia

Highlights include: Jason Nelson, currently completing his Phd at Griffith University in Australia in Net Art and Electronic Literature. His online game “i made this. you play this. we are enemies.” is an art game and interactive digital poem which uses game levels built on screen shots from influential community based websites/portals. Featuring messy hand drawn elements, strange texts, sounds and multimedia layering, the artwork lets users play in the worlds hovering over and beneath what we browse, to exist outside/over their controlling constraints. This project is also featured in the Exhibit/Interact event at the Sheppard Gallery.
http://www.secrettechnology.com/madethis/enemy6.html

Support:

Prospectives.09 is sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Arts Council, City of Reno Arts and Culture Commission, University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Liberal Arts, School of the Arts, Department of Art and The Digital Media Studio, The Lucy Neider Legacy Fund, The Benna Foundation for Excellence in the Fine Arts, The Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery, the Fleischman Planetarium and Science Center, the Nevada Museum of Art and Circus Circus Hotel and Casino.

Contact info:
Joseph DeLappe, Chair, Festival Director 775-784-6624
Jeffrey Erickson, co-Director, Sheppard Gallery 775-784-6658
Dan Ruby, Associate Director, Fleishmann Planetarium 775-784-1759

Images:
Images available on request, please contact:
Joseph DeLappe
775-784-6624
delappe@unr.edu



FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM HOLDS FREE EVENTS FOR KIDS AND FAMILIES

The University of Nevada, Reno’s Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center and NV Energy are offering a free public admission day and free screenings of the movie “Solar Max” Thursday, Nov. 5 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. NV Energy will donate $6 to DRI’s GreenPower energy conservation education program for every person attending the event. Also, Pine Middle School eighth-graders will be treated to a field trip at the Planetarium to learn about the new solar panel and wind turbine donated by a grant from the NV Energy Foundation.

Wednesday, Nov. 4

Who: Pine Middle School eighth-graders. NV Energy will donate $4 for each field trip student attending.
What: Field trip to Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center centered around renewable energy, in partnership with NV Energy and DRI’s GreenPower program
Where: Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, north of Lawlor Events Center, Virginia Street and 16th street, University of Nevada, Reno campus
When: 10 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 4 For more information on the GreenPower program or the field trip, contact Fayth Ross, GreenPower Outreach Administrator, (775) 673-7412 or Fayth.Ross@dri.edu

Thursday, Nov. 5

Who: Reno-area residents and families. NV Energy will donate $6 to DRI’s GreenPower energy conservation education program for every person attending.
What: Free Public Admission Day and viewing of the movie, “Solar Max,” each hour on the hour. Family-friendly, fun-filled afternoon of free activities, complementary and unique Tahoe Creamery “Sunburst” ice cream, discounts in the Planetarium gift shop and the University’s Joe Crowley Student Union ASUN Bookstore, and meal deals from Student Union food vendors.
The Planetarium gift shop is offering a 10 percent discount during the event. Nearby, the ASUN bookstore in the University’s Joe Crowley Student Union is offering a 20 percent discount on clothing, gifts and general books. Cantina del Lobo is turning Happy Hour into Happy Day with extended offerings of half-priced appetizers and burritos to anyone with a Planetarium flier, obtainable at the free-admission event, and Spudistro will be giving one free drink with each purchase.
Where: Free admission event at Fleischmann Planetarium, Virginia Street and 16th street; discounts and meal deals inside the Joe Crowley Student Union, University of Nevada, Reno.
When: 3-8 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 5

Parking for the events is free in the University’s West Stadium Garage.

For more information, contact Dan Ruby, associate director, Fleischmann Planetarium, (775) 784-4812.



SUMMER 2009 PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES

For more information, view or print  pdf  >



Daily through September 6, 2009
FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM ANNOUNCES A STELLAR LINEUP OF LARGE-FORMAT FEATURE FILMS, DIGITAL STAR SHOWS AND MORE FOR SUMMER 2009

"Ride Around the World," "Two Small Pieces of Glass," "Dawn of the Space Age" and more featured through Sept. 6, 2009 - many showing daily

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno offers several breathtaking immersive theater experiences in Summer 2009 - including "Ride Around the World," a large-format feature film, as well as two new full-dome digital shows: "Two Small Pieces of Glass," presented as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, and "Dawn of the Space Age," commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Moon Landing, July 20, 1969. In addition to other featured shows, Fleischmann Planetarium will offer weekly showings of the full-dome HD digital rock 'n' roll masterpiece, "The Wall."

All shows play through Sept. 6, 2009, accompanied by a number of other planetarium favorites showing daily:

"Ride Around the World," the season's featured SkyDome 8/70 large-format film, explores a thriving global culture that has helped shape Western civilization. The horse has been central to many cultures for centuries. Ride with some of the world's most notable horse peoples of Morocco, Spain, Mexico, Argentina, Patagonia, the American Southwest and Canada in this spectacular and memorable film. "Ride Around the World" plays daily at 1 and 5 p.m. with an additional showing at 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Call for July 3 schedule. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

Presented as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, marking the 400th anniversary of Galileo's use of an astronomical telescope, "Two Small Pieces of Glass" is a stunning historical chronicle - from Galileo's simple telescope to the latest discoveries in space - including interviews with the world's leading astrophysicists. "Two Small Pieces of Glass" plays daily at noon and 4 p.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

Commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Moon Landing, July 20, 1969, "Dawn of the Space Age" traces major achievements in space exploration from the launch of Sputnik to magnificent lunar landings and space flights. This historic reconstruction of humankind's first steps into space features the men and women whose drive and perseverance have led us into new frontiers. "Dawn of the Space Age" plays daily at 2 and 6 p.m. (No 6 p.m. showing the first Friday of each month during SkyTonight Star Talk). $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

Pink Floyd's legendary rock 'n' roll masterpiece "The Wall" is recreated in a stunning HD digital interpretation of sight and sound. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. "The Wall" plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. Call for July schedule. $6 adult/$4 seniors over 55. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is located north of Lawlor Events Center on Virginia and 16th streets, on the University of Nevada, Reno campus. Free parking is available in designated spaces in the West Stadium Parking Complex, level 3, just east of the Planetarium. For more information about tickets and showtimes, call (775) 784-4811.

Also showing through Sept. 6, 2009, at Fleischmann Planetarium:

"Amazing Journeys," the season's continuing SkyDome 8/70 large-format film, presents some of nature's most awe-inspiring spectacles tracked first hand as millions of creatures embark on extraordinary journeys of survival. You'll be amazed as countless species sense "secret signals" that spark their migratory patterns, moving them to travel with uncanny directional accuracy on these miraculous journeys. "Amazing Journeys" plays daily at 3 p.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

In "The Secret of the Cardboard Rocket" (recommended for children in grades 1-4, but fun for all ages), audiences climb aboard a virtual, magical cardboard rocket with two young adventurers to experience a breathtaking, up-close look at each of our solar system's planets. Discover the secret to making this seemingly impossible trip to the edges of the universe and back, and gain a new sense of wonder about space along the way. Shown daily at 11 a.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call the Fleischmann Planetarium at (775) 784-4812 for details.

What's happening in the sky tonight? "Live SkyTonight Star Talk" answers that question in an informal and entertaining immersive multimedia presentation aided by state-of-the-art technology, followed by telescope viewing (weather permitting) at the Planetarium's observatory site in Rancho San Rafael Park, courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada. "Live SkyTonight Star Talk" takes place the first Friday of each month at 6 p.m. at Fleischmann Planetarium. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55.

The Planetarium Exhibit Hall museum contains permanent exhibits including large-scale rotating Earth and Moon globes, a black hole demonstrator and the largest collection of meteorites in the state. The Planetarium is currently hosting an exhibition created by the University's Department of Psychology exploring visual perception. Exhibitions are free.

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is open every day, 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, 10:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.); closed only on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day. Admission is free to the Planetarium exhibits and gift shop. Special packages are available for school field trips and other groups.

For tickets and more information, call (775) 784-4811.

Click here for more show information.


Built in 1964, the Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center on the University of Nevada, Reno campus was the first planetarium in the world to project full-dome movies, and is currently one of the first of a handful of planetariums around the world to utilize the Spitz SciDome digital projector, a high-resolution, state-of-the-art immersive visualization tool. The projector is also adaptable to a number of disciplines and uses, supporting collaborations among the planetarium, other University departments and programs, and community organizations. The planetarium's uniquely shaped building was designed by famed Reno architect Ray Hellman and is listed on the National Register of Historic Buildings. Fleischmann Planetarium serves more than 50,000 visitors a year, including hundreds of school field trips that introduce students, K-12, to the wonders of the universe.


 

FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM AND COMMUNITY PARTNERS HOST FREE TELESCOPE VIEWING APRIL 2-5 FOR INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF ASTRONOMY 100 HOURS OF ASTRONOMY PROJECT

As part of the 100 Hours of Astronomy Cornerstone Project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno, the University’s Department of Physics, the Astronomical Society of Nevada, Tahoe Star Tours and Western Nevada College will offer a variety of free telescope viewing activities for all ages April 2-5 at the Planetarium on the University campus, at Rancho San Rafael Park in Reno, and at the Jack C. Davis Observatory at Western Nevada College in Carson City April 2-5, 2009. Telescopes will be provided by organizers and community volunteers.
 
“Our northern Nevada 100 Hours of Astronomy events are designed to open the universe to a diverse audience, many of whom may not have the resources or may never have had the opportunity to see the stars up close,” said Dan Ruby, associate director of Fleischmann Planetarium. “All of the organizations involved in this series of stargazing activities are dedicated to educating the public about astronomy and raising interest in science. It’s really a tremendous collaboration.”
 
According to Ruby, 100 Hours of Astronomy is an official Cornerstone Project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, which marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first use of telescopes, as well as the 400th anniversary of the publication of Astronomia Nova, Johannes Kepler’s work outlining the laws of planetary motion. 100 Hours of Astronomy is a worldwide event featuring diverse public outreach activities around the globe April 2-5, 2009, when the moon goes from first quarter to gibbous — good lunar phases for observing the night skies.
 
“Saturn will be visible, which will be exciting to see, and so will Orion and the Pleiades — a cluster of a few hundred stars also called the Seven Sisters, who according to myth were saved from Orion’s lust by Zeus,” Ruby said. “Viewing the Pleiades is especially appropriate to celebrate the International Year of Astronomy, since the cluster is 400 light years away, which means the light we’ll be seeing from it began its journey at the time Galileo was first using telescopes.”  
 
Northern Nevada 100 Hours of Astronomy events include:

Thursday, April 2, 10 a.m.-10 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of Tahoe Star Tours and the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Physics. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.
 
Friday, April 3, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of Tahoe Star Tours and the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Physics. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.
 
Friday, April 3, 8-10 p.m.
Free telescope viewing at Rancho San Rafael Park courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada.
 
Saturday, April 4, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.

Saturday, April 4, 3-10 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of Tahoe Star Tours and the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Physics. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.
 
Saturday, April 4, 8 p.m.-Sunday, April 5, 6 a.m.
Free nightlong telescope viewing at the Jack C. Davis Observatory at Western Nevada College, 2201 West College Parkway, Carson City.
 
Sunday, April 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.
 
Sunday, April 5, 3-10 p.m.
Free telescope viewing and astronomy activities on the Fleischmann Planetarium lawn courtesy of Tahoe Star Tours and the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Physics. Telescopes with filters will be used for solar viewing of sunspots and flares during the day.
 
For more about the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Physics, visit: http://physics.unr.edu/
For more about the Jack C. Davis Observatory at Western Nevada College, visit: http://www.wnc.edu/location/carson/buildings/obsv.php
For more about Tahoe Star Tours, visit: http://www.tahoestartours.com/
For more about the Astronomical Society of Nevada, visit: http://www.astronomynv.org/

 


FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM CELEBRATES DARK-SKIES AWARENESS AT EARTH HOUR EVENT MARCH 28 AT THE RIVER SCHOOL

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center invites the community to free Earth Hour stargazing event promoting dark-skies awareness and global sustainability.
 
From 8:30-9:30 p.m. local time worldwide on March 28, 2009, as many as 1 billion individuals and organizations will turn off their lights as part of Earth Hour, a global initiative led by the World Wildlife Fund. Organizers call Earth Hour participation a “global vote” for the environment demonstrating participants’ commitment to global sustainability. The event began in 2007 in Sydney with 2.2 million homes and businesses and grew to more than 50 million participants in 400 cities on seven continents in 2008. To date, more than 1,700 cities in 80 countries worldwide have committed to participating in Earth Hour 2009.

In addition to saving energy often generated from nonrenewable sources, the hour-long, lights-out event will raise awareness of — and reduce — light pollution, providing an opportunity to view stars often rendered invisible to the human eye by artificial light that fills the night skies. Earth Hour will also mark the culmination of the two-week worldwide GLOBE at Night Dark Skies Awareness Project held March 16-28, a campaign offering diverse educational opportunities designed to raise awareness of the effects of light pollution.

Locally, Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno will celebrate Earth Hour and Dark Skies Awareness from 7-10 p.m., Saturday, March 28, at the River School, 7777 White Fir St. in Reno. The evening of free events will include a dark-skies film at 7 p.m., lights-out stargazing at the River School amphitheater for Earth Hour, 8:30-9:30 p.m., and a bonfire and celebration starting at 9:30 p.m. Refreshments will be available for a donation to the River School, which is lending its facilities in support Earth Hour and Dark Skies Awareness.

“GLOBE at Night Dark Skies Awareness is an official cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, which marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s first telescope and the date that Kepler’s first laws were published,” said Dan Ruby, associate director of Fleischmann Planetarium.

“From March 16-28, individuals and organizations around the globe will be raising awareness of the effects of light pollution, which obscures up to 90 percent of the stars in the night sky for one out of 10 people worldwide, two out of five Americans and one out of six Europeans according to some sources. Our Earth Hour event in Reno will be just one of many educational and social manifestations of community and individual concern for the environment and for the detrimental effects of light pollution on human health.”

According to the Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, billions of dollars are spent on unnecessary lighting in the United States each year — lighting that requires energy often generated by nonrenewable energy sources releasing an estimated 38 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually. The organization estimates that $1.7 billion is spent in the U.S. each year on unshielded outdoor lights alone, responsible for as much as 1.2 million tons of carbon dioxide waste.

Defined by the International Dark-Sky Association as any adverse effect of artificial light, light pollution has been shown to affect the mating, migration and predation behaviors of a wide range of species, disrupting ecosystems and thereby producing immeasurable environmental effects which compound the environmental effects of burning energy to produce light and the less tangible effects of making the stars invisible to humans and animals.

“This event is about voicing our support as a global community for climate-change policy,” said Jessica Henning, a graduate assistant in the University of Nevada, Reno’s Department of Environmental Health working toward a master’s degree in the University’s environmental sciences graduate program. “In Reno, as in many cities, we are partnering with the GLOBE at Night Dark Skies Awareness program and Earth Hour to draw awareness to climate change and dark skies at the same time, and to show how the two are connected.”

Henning is working with Jason Geddes, vice chair of the Nevada System of Higher Education Board of Regents and energy coordinator for the City of Reno, on passing a resolution through the Reno City Council encouraging local casinos to reduce or eliminate outdoor lighting along with other landmark city lights including the Reno Arch in observance of Earth Hour, March 28, 8:30-9:30 p.m.

The River School is located at 7777 White Fir St., in west Reno. To reach the River School take W. 4th St. to Woodland Ave., two miles west of McCarran Blvd. Go south on Woodland Ave. and take the next left onto White Fir St. Turn left at the Interpretive Gardens sign into the last driveway, near the cul-de-sac at the end of the street.

For more information about the free event, or for Planetarium show tickets and showtimes, call (775) 784-4811. For more information about joining Friends of the Planetarium and upcoming exhibits, events and shows playing in the Star Theater, call (775) 784-4812.

For more about Dark Skies Awareness, visit: http://www.darkskiesawareness.org/
For more about GLOBE at Night global sky observation, visit: http://www.globe.gov/GaN/
For more about Earth Hour, visit: http://www.earthhour.org/
For more about The River School, visit: http://www.riverschool.info

About the River School

The River School is an educational and event center that demonstrates a holistic approach to sustainable living, bioregional design, and creative expression through a wide array of classes, workshops and events.  For more about the River School, visit the school website or call (775) 747-3910.

 


FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM HOSTS “PUSH, PULL AND DRAG: HANDS-ON SCIENCE DEMONSTRATIONS” — A DAY OF FREE EVENTS FOR KIDS, MARCH 21

Boy Scout Troop 443 and Eagle Scout candidate Denis Barsalou invite the community to participate in a day of fun and learning at the Planetarium.

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno, in partnership with local Boy Scouts of America (BSA) Troop 443, will host “Push, Pull and Drag: Hands-on Science Demonstrations,” Saturday, March 21, 2009, from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Planetarium on the University campus. The event is free and open to all ages.

A series of five hands-on science demonstrations set up as experiment stations will allow kids of all ages to participate and observe a variety of aspects of science. The experiments and stations were researched, developed and built by Denis Barsalou, a freshman at Spanish Springs High School, as part of his leadership service project leading to the rank of Eagle Scout. Barsalou is a member of BSA Troop 443, which will also assist with the event.

“We were pleased that Denis wanted to partner with the Planetarium and share his project with the community,” said Dan Ruby, Planetarium associate director. “He’s done a great job of researching and building these exhibits and I know his troop is proud of his efforts.”

“I selected this project specifically because of my love of science and my focus on space and astronomy,” Eagle Scout candidate Denis Barsalou said. “I also wanted to help others learn how to enjoy science and to learn in the process. The goal is that everyone who participates will learn something, whether it is a science fact or that they have more interest in something new.”

Barsalou’s five “Push, Pull and Drag” experiment stations will remain on display at the Planetarium after the event. “The hands-on exhibits are designed for elementary school kids but should be fun for all ages.” Barsalou said. Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is located north of Lawlor Events Center on Virginia and 16th streets, on the University of Nevada, Reno campus. Free parking is available in the West Stadium Parking Complex, level 3, just east of the Planetarium.

For more information about the free event, or for Planetarium show tickets and showtimes, call (775) 784-4811. For more information about joining Friends of the Planetarium, and upcoming exhibits, events and shows playing in the Star Theater, call (775) 784-4812.



Daily through Sept. 5, 2008-Jan. 4, 2009
FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM ANNOUNCES A STELLAR LINEUP OF LARGE-FORMAT FEATURE FILMS, STAR SHOWS AND DIGITAL LIGHT SHOWS FOR FALL 2008 FEATURING “SOLAR MAX,” “BLACK HOLES” AND “U2”

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno offers two breathtaking immersive theater experiences in Fall 2008 — “Solar Max,” a large-format feature film by John Weiley, and “Extreme Planets,” a full-dome digital star show by Clark Planetarium Productions. Fleischmann Planetarium will also feature Clark Planetarium’s recently released full-dome digital rock ’n roll light show, “U2.” All three shows play through Jan. 4, 2009, accompanied by a number of other planetarium favorites showing daily.

“Solar Max” SkyDome 8/70TM large-format feature film transports audiences to the awesome vastness and mysterious power of our closest star as never before. Director/producer John Weiley dazzles viewers with thought-provoking concepts and jaw-dropping footage of the Earth’s sun captured from international sites including the European Space Agency/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). “Solar Max” plays daily at 1, 3 and 7 p.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call (775) 784-4812 for details.

The full-dome digital star show “Black Holes” takes audiences on a journey through one of the most mystifying, awe-inspiring phenomena in the universe. What is a black hole? Where do they come from? Where do they go? How do we find them? Is there one on Earth’s horizon? Explore the most recent discoveries in a show featuring the latest in full-dome 3-D animation technology. “Black Holes” plays daily at 2 and 6 p.m., with additional noon showings on weekends and Oct. 31, Nov. 11, Nov. 28 and Dec. 22-Jan. 2. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. Museum admission is free. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call (775) 784-4812 for details.

You’ve heard the band. Now see the music. Clark Planetarium Productions just launched a much-anticipated music entertainment show featuring one of the greatest bands of all time. “U2” is the first-ever full-dome production integrating the band’s timeless classics and modern hits with the latest original full-dome art and interpretation, lighting effects, laser-beam work and live-performance special effects to create a thrilling one-of-a-kind immersive theater experience. It will rock your world. “U2” plays Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. $6 adult/$4 seniors over 55.

For tickets and more information, call (775) 784-4811.

Click here for more show information.

Also showing through Jan. 4, 2009, at Fleischmann Planetarium:

MacGillivray Freeman’s new Skydome 8/70TM large-format feature film “The Alps” carries audiences to the sheer rock-and-ice wall known as the Eiger North Face in the thin air above Switzerland, where an American climber embarks on the most perilous and meaningful ascent of his life. In this extraordinary emotional journey through Europe’s majestic Alps, audiences experience the exhilarating true story of a man who overcomes his darkest fears to realize his greatest potential in one of the world’s most extreme environments. Shown daily at 5 p.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call (775) 784-4812 for details.

“Ultimate Universe” will take you on a grand celestial tour from the outer reaches of space through wondrous galaxies to the majesty of our own galaxy. This full-dome digital star show uses the latest 3-D animation technology to reveal the awesome power of the universe and its most provocative secrets. Shown daily at 4 p.m. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call (775) 784-4812 for details.

“Legends of the Night Sky: Orion” takes a light-hearted look at the ancient Greek mythology behind the winter constellations. The full-dome digital star show by Audio Visual Imagineering® and Spitz® features funny and engaging characters like Aesop the Owl and Socrates the mouse who will entertain and educate parents and guardians and their young children. Shown at 11 a.m. weekends and on Oct. 31, Nov. 11, Nov. 28 and Dec. 22-Jan. 2. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55. A discount may be available for the second show in a daily double feature. Call (775) 784-4812 for details.

What’s happening in the sky tonight? “Live SkyTonight Star Talk” answers that question in an informal and entertaining immersive multimedia presentation aided by state-of-the-art technology, followed by telescope viewing (weather permitting) at the Planetarium’s observatory site in Rancho San Rafael Park, courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada. “Live SkyTonight Star Talk” takes place the first Friday of each month at 6 p.m. at Fleischmann Planetarium. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55.

Narrated by National Public Radio’s Noah Adams, “Season of Light” is a full-dome digital show that celebrates many of the world’s holiday customs and explores how diverse cultures light up the season. Shown at 8 p.m. Sunday-Thursday through December. $6 adult/$4 children under 13 and seniors over 55.

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is closed Nov. 27 and Dec. 25, 2008.

For tickets and more information, call (775) 784-4811.

Click here for more show information.

 


 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM NAMED TO NASA RESEARCH EXPEDITION TO CHILE AS PART OF EARTH-MARS CAVE DETECTION PROGRAM

A research expedition through the desert caves of Chile may give NASA scientists just the information they need to one day survive on Mars.

And while Reno astronomer Dan Ruby mainly looks skyward as part of his work as associate director of Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno, this summer he’s been tapped to go underground as one of a 10-member team of astrophysicists, geologists, speleologists and others who will spend a month in Chile’s Atacama desert region, developing techniques for discovering and studying the caves on Mars.

Dan Ruby-NASA team member  

UPDATE: YAHOO! News features discoveries made on NASA’s Chilean cave expedition with planetarium associate director, Dan Ruby.








Fleischmann Planetarium associate director, Dan Ruby will participate in Phase ll of the NASA Earth-Mars Cave Detection Program, set to study the Atacama desert cave region in Chile, July 15-Aug. 15, 2008.


As the driest place on Earth and one similar geologically to Mars, the Atacama region is as close to conditions on Mars as can be found anywhere on our planet. Joining Phase ll of NASA’s Earth-Mars Cave Detection Program from July 15-Aug. 15, Ruby and scientists on the expedition in northern Chile will map and plant sensors in lava tube and salt caves similar to those expected on Mars.

“Martian caves have already been detected through techniques developed by this program, and are significant as a potential habitat for microorganisms and other extremeophiles that might exist or have existed on Mars,” Ruby said. “They may also serve as future habitats for astronaut explorers to the red planet, as they offer protection from radiation and the harsh environment of the surface.”

Funded by NASA-Ames and SETI-CSC and led by Jut Wynne of the USGS-Southwest Biological Science Center in Arizona, Phase ll of the NASA expedition is part of a larger three-year study of caves in the Atacama desert, where thermal imaging of cave entrances has helped refine techniques already proven successful in finding caves on Mars through remote sensing. Wynne and NASA’s Astrobiology/Exobiology Program intend to find whether it is possible to detect caves by studying the amount of heat they radiate. If the team can reliably pinpoint caves on Earth, Wynn believes it should be possible to do the same on Mars.

“Phase ll will use an instrument called a QWISP, quantum well infrared photometer — basically a high-tech thermal camera — intended for use on future Mars obiter, lander and rover missions,” Ruby said. "This project plays a small part to help lay the foundations for the next generation of Mars exploration, both manned and unmanned, which will have immeasurable payoff for humankind."

Fleischmann Planetarium’s involvement in the project stems from associate director Dan Ruby’s participation in Phase l as part of NASA’s Spaceward Bound program, which puts teachers and educators such as Ruby, in the field with planetary scientists to bring back and share current NASA research with their classrooms and the public. In spring 2007 Ruby spent a week in the Mojave Desert, working with a team using a hot-air balloon to photograph volcanic caves. He will serve as a mapping assistant during Phase ll and expects to return to Reno with plenty of new insights.

The 10 team members in Phase ll of the NASA Earth-Mars Cave Detection Program represent the Northern Arizona University; the University of Nevada, Reno; the University of New Mexico; the University of Virginia and other American agencies and organizations; a Chilean geologist from Universidad Católica del Norte is the logistics lead.

“I’m honored to be part of this expedition and excited to do the fieldwork,” Ruby said. “This opportunity provides the public with a connection to cutting-edge space research, and greatly benefits our planetarium programs, which attract more than 57,000 visitors a year, including the 15,000 students who visit on field trips. It contributes another link to the already-strong relationship the University of Nevada, Reno has with NASA projects, and opens the door for similar opportunities in the future for students and other scholars and colleagues.”
 
For more information about the Atacama Cave expedition and the Earth-Mars Cave Detection Program, visit the NASA Astrobiology website at http://astrobiology.nasa.gov/ .

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is located north of Lawlor Events Center on North Virginia and 16th streets, on the University of Nevada, Reno campus, 1.5 miles north of the downtown Reno arch. Free parking is available in the West Stadium Parking Complex, level 3, just east of the Planetarium.

For more information about the planetarium and its involvement in the NASA program, call (775) 784-4812 or visit http://planetarium.unr.edu.
 
The first planetarium in Nevada, Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno has brought the universe to the community since 1963. Also the first planetarium in the world to project full-dome movies on a 30-foot-diameter dome, Fleischmann Planetarium has educated and entertained generations of school children and adults, inspiring imaginations and expanding horizons.

 



FALL 2008 PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES

For more information, view or print  pdf>>
 



FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM BECOMES PARTNER OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY CENTERS (ASTC)

Planetarium members to receive free admission to hundreds of ASTC-partner museums and centers worldwide

The Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno has become a new partner of the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC), an organization dedicated to furthering public understanding of science among increasingly diverse audiences. ASTC encourages excellence and innovation in informal science learning, in part by serving and linking its members worldwide.

Founded in 1973, ASTC numbers more than 540 members in 40 countries, including science centers and museums, nature centers, aquariums, planetariums, zoos, botanical gardens, space theaters and natural history and children’s museums.

Members of the Fleischmann Planetarium and any of the ASTC’s partnering organizations also benefit from the ASTC’s Passport Program, which provides free admission to hundreds of partner museums and centers around the world.

“The planetarium’s membership in this important organization means our own members will benefit directly, with free entrance to all sorts of great museums,” said Dan Ruby, associate director of the Fleischmann Planetarium. “We think it’s an awesome opportunity for our members and for other ASTC members visiting us.”

According to Ruby, the Passport Program is just one of many benefits of the partnership.

“In addition to providing our members access to a vast range of resources and member benefits at hundreds of our partner institutions worldwide, this new partnership will help Fleischmann develop exhibits and services to better serve the community,” Ruby said. “Our staff now has access to membership and visitor data and statistics that will help tremendously in our program development.”

Like Fleischmann Planetarium, a large percentage of ASTC institutions are part of a university or affiliated with one, and as such, can offer valuable data for program development to meet the University of Nevada, Reno’s needs.

“This will give us insights into how to develop increasingly effective collaborations with the University and community,” Ruby said. “I can’t tell you how excited we are to be able to offer so many benefits to our members, the University and the community as a result of this new partnership.” For more about the ASTC Passport Program and participating museums and centers worldwide, click here.

 



FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM AND SCIENCE CENTER OFFERS LEGO© ROBOTICS WORKSHOPS MAY 17-19, 2008

Aspiring scientists ages 10-14 are invited to engage in hands-on learning and fun during two-hour mini-robotics sessions

Join science teacher and robot-building expert Paul Nagelkerke for a two-hour mini-robotics workshop at the University of Nevada, Reno Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, held Saturday, May 17, 10 a.m.-noon, 1-3 p.m., or 4-6 p.m.; Sunday, May 18, 10 a.m.-noon, 1-3 p.m., or 4-6 p.m.; or Monday, May 19, 10 a.m.-noon or 1-3 p.m. The fee for each two-hour workshop is $35 per participant age 10-14, and includes a souvenir t-shirt.  

Workshop participants ages 10-14 will build a small LEGO© Mindstorms Sumo Robot (one per participant) and learn how to program the robot to battle in a sumo competition at the conclusion of the class. Concepts explored include balance and speed versus force, and traction versus power. All parts and equipment must be returned at the end of the workshop. Parents are encouraged to attend to watch the construction and competition at no charge.  

The instructor for the Planetarium’s LEGO© Robotics Workshops is Paul Nagelkerke, M.Sc., a science teacher at the Silbury Education and Resource Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia. Nagelkerke has presented robot-building classes at schools, summer camps and science centers throughout the United States and Canada. In addition to teaching, he builds robot props for films and television in southwestern British Columbia. Visit http://www.geocities.com/PantomimeRobotics for more information about Paul Nagelkerke.  

Advance registration is required. To register, download the LEGO© Robotics flier, fill out the registration form and return to Fleischmann Planetarium at the University of Nevada, Reno by mail or in person, or call (775) 784-4812 for more details or to register by phone. No drop-in participants will be admitted. Registrations cannot be reserved until payment of $35 per participant is received in full. A 10 percent discount is available to Fleischmann Planetarium Nova Team members. Each session is limited to 10 participants; early registration is recommended. Classes will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants will be contacted by phone to confirm registration.




FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM LAUNCHES PLANET-X FRIENDS OF THE PLANETARIUM EVENT THE THIRD THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH

Join Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center at the University of Nevada, Reno the third Thursday of every month from 5:30-7:30 p.m. for Planet-X Friends of the Planetarium Night featuring performances from KTHX-FM 100.1 DJs and spectacular light shows utilizing Fleischmann’s state-of-the-art digital planetarium.

The event is free for Friends of the Planetarium members, or $5 for nonmembers. Tickets are available at the door. Come down and consider the benefits of membership including exclusive invitations to new show previews, discounts on telescopes and gift shop merchandise, reduced or free admission to feature films and star shows, and much more.

Planet-X Friends of the Planetarium Night features:
• A series of 20-minute shows in the Star Theater featuring music from KTHX and visuals from the edge of space
• Out-of-this world music performances from KTHX DJs in the Exhibit Hall
• Giveaway drawings for T-shirts, software, science-themed gifts and more
Libations from renowned local sponsors including Great Basin Brewing Company, Red’s Little Waldorf, Tahoe Creamery, Sierra Wine & Spirits and others
• A children’s science craft studio facilitated by Planetarium staff
• Classic sci-fi movies recovered from the vaults of time
• And more!

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is located north of Lawlor Events Center on North Virginia and 16th streets, on the University of Nevada, Reno campus, 1.5 miles north of the downtown Reno arch. Free parking is available in the West Stadium Parking Complex, level 3, just east of the Planetarium.

For more information about joining Friends of the Planetarium, Planet-X Night, and upcoming exhibits, events and shows playing in the Star Theater, call (775) 784-4812.

 



“PERCEPTUAL RELATIVITY” EXHIBITION EXPLORING THE HUMAN MIND OPENS DEC. 7 AT FLEISCHMANN PLANETARIUM ON THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO CAMPUS

Events include opening reception and presentation by Stuart Anstis, author and world-renowned scholar on human perception

What does it mean to see? “Perceptual Relativity,” an interactive exhibition developed by the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Psychology and on display at the University’s Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, explores individual perception through visual illusions — images that distort our perceptions in remarkable ways. An opening reception, Friday, Dec. 7, 2007, at the Fleischmann Planetarium will kick off with a presentation by world-renowned scholar, Stuart Anstis, Ph.D., from the University of California, San Diego. The lecture, reception and exhibition are free and open to the public.

The multimedia exhibit will be a permanent installation in Fleischmann Planetarium throughout 2008, enhanced with several changing displays and new content during the year. The exhibit allows visitors to explore dozens of illusions where stationary figures appear to move, lines and colors are warped by their surroundings, and entirely new perceptions emerge simply by turning the picture. Reaching far beyond the surface of perceptions, these illusions provide a powerful window into the workings of the human mind.

Guest lecturer Stuart Anstis, Ph.D., is an award-winning professor of psychology at the University of California, San Diego and a world-renowned expert on human perception. He has published more than 120 papers on a wide range of discoveries in vision, hearing and touch, and has given more than 250 invited presentations on his research throughout the United States, Europe and Japan. His work has been featured in Discover magazine and on numerous television programs. He has won awards as an outstanding teacher at York University and at Earl Warren College, UCSD.

The “Perceptual Relativity” exhibit was created by faculty and students in the graduate program in cognitive and brain sciences in the University of Nevada, Reno Department of Psychology, and is supported by grants from the Optical Society of America and the University of Nevada, Reno College of Liberal Arts.

The opening lecture, “Illusions are Not What They Seem,” by Stuart Anstis, will be held Friday, Dec. 7 at 4 p.m. in the University’s new Joe Crowley Student Union movie theatre, third floor. A reception follows at the Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center from 5-7 p.m. The exhibition will be open daily, Sunday-Thursday from 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday and Saturday until 9 p.m., and closed Christmas and New Year’s Day. All events are free.

The Fleischmann Planetarium is located north of Lawlor Events Center on Virginia and 16th streets, on the University of Nevada, Reno campus. The Crowley Student Union is located just east of Lawlor Events Center. Free parking is available for both events in the West Stadium Parking Complex, level 3, just east of the planetarium.   

For more information about all the events and shows at Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center, call (775) 784-4812 or visit: http://www.planetarium.unr.edu.

Fleischmann Planetarium and Science Center is part of the University of Nevada, Reno and Extended Studies, offering science-related exhibits, public star shows and large-format films, as well as public star observing courtesy of the Astronomical Society of Nevada. The planetarium’s uniquely shaped building was designed by famed Reno architect Ray Hellman and is listed on the National Register of Historic Buildings. Built in 1964, it was the first planetarium in the world to project full-dome movies, and is currently one of the first of a handful of planetariums around the world to utilize the Spitz SciDome digital projector, a high-resolution, state-of-the-art immersive visualization tool. The projector is also adaptable to a number of disciplines and uses, supporting collaborations among the planetarium, other University departments and programs, and community organizations. Fleischmann Planetarium serves more than 40,000 visitors a year, including hundreds of school field trips that introduce students, K-12, to the wonders of the universe.

 


FIRST THURSDAYS AT NEVADA MUSEUM OF ART

Join the Planetarium and KTHX-FM 100.1 at the Nevada Museum of Art the first Thursday of each month, 5-7 p.m., for live music and refreshments.

$10 adult • $8 seniors, students • $2 children • NMA members FREE

Visit www.nevadaart.org for details.

 


STARS OVER  X-VILLE

Attention sky-watchers! Tune in to “Stars Over X-ville” on KTHX-FM 100.1 every Tuesday morning at 7:45 a.m. for an update on happenings in northern Nevada’s skies, with Dan Ruby, planetarium associate director. See the latest report.

 


NEWS ARCHIVE

• Climb along the “The Alps ” and discover “Extreme Planets”!  more >>

• Investigate the “Mystery of the Nile” and explore the “Ultimate Universe”!  more >>

• The 1st Reno Interdisciplinary Festival of New Media will feature a selection of full-dome videos, Nov. 16.  more >>

• Discover What's "UP" at Fleischmann Planetarium's Grand Re-opening!  more >>

• NEW! Special birthday party packages for children!  pdf >>

 

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